Join our list of informed global advertisers seeking to improve the financial stewardship of their marketing investment. Click Here to Subscribe

Marketing MathTM

Category Archives: Marketing Agencies

Beginning of Agency Brand Consolidation Movement?

14 Sep

full service advertisingMediaPost reported that WPP consolidated 5 different brand consultancy/ design firms into one larger, global brand agency. This continues a trend for WPP, having consolidated e-commerce agency Salmon under Wunderman in June and and ad buying firm, Maxus under MEC.

There are many good reasons for the agency holding companies to considering brand consolidation … Read More

Will AI Render Media Agencies Obsolete?

11 Sep

artificial_intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is already reshaping how advertising is developed, planned and placed. The marketing applications being envisioned and adopted by agencies, consultancies, publishers and advertisers are nothing short of remarkable.

From the onset of “Big Data” it stood to reason that the concept of predictive analysis, the act of mining diverse sets of data to generate recommendations wouldn’t be far behind. Layer on natural language processing, which converts text into structured data, and it is clear to see that “deep learning” is on the verge of revolutionizing the ad industry. As it stands, algorithms are currently optimizing bids for media buying, utilizing custom and syndicated data to match audience desires (or at least experiences) with available inventory.

Effective, efficient, automated methodologies for sorting through vast volumes of data to evaluate and establish patterns that reflect customer behavior for use in segmenting audiences and customizing message construction and delivery holds obvious promise.

So, what does this mean for media agencies? Will they be at the forefront of automation technology? Or will they be swept away by the consultancies and ad tech providers that are already investing here?

If media agencies desire to remain in control as the industry evolves, there are real challenges that they will have to address to remain viable:

  • Re-establish role as “trusted advisor” with the advertiser community. Recent concerns over transparency, unsavory revenue generation practices and a failure to pro-actively safeguard advertisers’ media investments from fraud and from running in inappropriate environments have created serious client/ agency relationship concerns.
  • Attract, train and retain top-level talent to re-staff media planning and buying departments. The focus will need to be on bridging the gap between developing, and applying automation technology and providing high-level consulting support focused on brand growth to their clients. Presently, media agencies are not effectively competing for talent, whether in the context of compensation and or personal and career development options being offered by their non-traditional competitors.
  • Provide a framework for addressing the compensation conundrum. Whether this is in the form of cost-based or performance-based fees tied to project outcomes, commissions or hybrid remuneration systems, tomorrow’s successful media agencies will need to establish clear, compelling compensation systems. These systems will need to reflect value propositions that will differentiate them from an expanded base of competitors, while offsetting (to some extent) non-transparent sources of revenue that many media shops have come to rely on in recent years.

This will not be an easy path for media agencies, particularly for those that are hampered by legacy systems, processes and management perspectives that may limit their ability to more broadly envision and ultimately, assist client organizations addressing their needs and expectations.

Either way, the race is on, as management consulting firms are acquiring various marketing and digital media specialist firms and as media agencies raid the consultancies for personnel to build out their strategic consulting capabilities. The key question will likely be, “Which business model holds the greatest promise, in the eyes of the Chief Marketing Officer, for improving brand performance?

 

 

 

 

 

Is the Agency Holding Company Model Viable Going Forward?

19 Oct

questionThe pursuit of excellence is less profitable than the pursuit of bigness, but it can be more satisfying.” 

 ~ David Ogilvy

It is not our intent to suggest that scale does not have its advantages. There are multiple instances, within the professional services sector in general and specifically within the ad agency community, where size translates into meaningful benefits for clients.

That said, since Papert, Koenig, Lois went public in 1962 and other advertising agencies soon followed suit, the ad industry has undergone dramatic change. Ad agency IPO’s begot an uptick in agencies acquiring other agencies, which Marion Harper, CEO of McCann Erickson pioneered with the formation of The Interpublic Group of Companies in the early ‘60’s. This was then followed by the “unbundling” phenomenon of the late ‘70’s and ‘80’s.

Fast forward to 2016, where the top five agency holding companies; WPP, Omnicom, Publicis Groupe, Interpublic Group and Dentsu account for over 70% of the world’s estimated 2016 ad spend of $542 Billion (source: eMarketer, April, 2016). Further, each of these holding companies have broadened their acquisition strategies to further penetrate the larger $1.0 Trillion global media and marketing services category.

As a result, the portfolios for the top five agency holding companies contain between dozens and several hundred firms covering a myriad of marketing disciplines including, but not limited to:

  • Creative agencies
  • Media agencies
  • Digital agencies
  • Social Media agencies
  • Brand activation firms
  • PR firms
  • Relationship management firms
  • Programmatic trading desk operations
  • Research and audience measurement firms
  • Media properties

It is clear that the agency holding companies have successfully pursued and achieved “bigness.” The question is; “Has the holding company model achieved “excellence?” The answer may well depend on which stakeholder group one belongs to. Shareowners will likely have one viewpoint, suppliers and employees another and clients perhaps yet another perspective.

In the early days, the primary role of the holding company was to pursue efficiencies across their agency portfolios, while leveraging cross-agency synergies and driving strategy across their portfolio firms. Four decades later, this has evolved into holding company “agency” solutions consisting of cross-firm, multi-disciplinary client service teams served up to the holding companies top global clients.

Yet, the holding companies are struggling to define and evolve cultures, eliminate inefficiencies and break down silos across the numerous agency brands and marketing services firms that they have acquired. All while wrestling with issues and opportunities tied to the rate and rapidity of technological change and its impact on the business of creating and placing ads and not least of all… technology’s impact on consumer media consumption and purchasing behavior.

Today, the agency community is facing challenges related to attracting and retaining talent, evolving remuneration systems and regaining advertiser trust, all while being mired in a very public dispute with advertisers, publishers and ad tech providers regarding the issue of transparency.

Simultaneously, serious competitors have emerged, threatening the ad agencies stranglehold on advertising, media and marketing services. Consulting organizations such as Accenture, IBM Interactive, Deloitte Digital and PwC Digital now offer comprehensive, end-to-end consumer solutions, which include branding, graphic design, creative and media services to complement their analytical, strategy consulting, enterprise digital solutions and customer experience design skills.

This new breed of competition has monolithic brands, established cultures and highly trained, intelligent, flexible global workforces. Also looming on the competitive horizon are firms such as Adobe, Oracle, SalesForce, Facebook and Google that continue to focus on serving up marketing services and support to advertisers on a direct basis.  

Perhaps most importantly, the ad agency holding companies may not control their own destiny. At least not to the extent that they once did, when serving as valued, trusted advisors to their clients providing high-level strategic support and maintaining solid C-suite level relationships. Further, advertisers today have shown an openness to evaluating alternatives to the traditional client/ agency model, which has favored the aforementioned consultancies, technology and media firms along with in-house solutions.

It is certainly too soon to count the holding companies out, as they remain a formidable force in the industry. The question is can holding company leadership successfully chart a new course for leveraging their scale and talents to boost their relevancy in the years to come. What advice might one of the industry’s most iconic leaders offer to his holding company contemporaries?

“Leaders grasp nettles.” ~ David Ogilvy

Sourcing Your Programmatic Buying Partner

14 Dec

programmatic agency sourcingWritten by Peter Portanova, Project Analyst for Source One Management Services

The concepts of reach and frequency have long guided the way marketers approach advertising, and when multiplied, they provide the calculation for Gross Rating Points (GRPs) to measure and evaluate the success of your campaigns. However, the rise of programmatic ad buying (automated buying based on real time data analysis of competitive rates) forces marketers to reconsider their historical understanding of success in marketing, and encourages the consideration of new and potentially more effective metrics.

GRPs are hugely important across a variety of marketing channels, exclusive of programmatic buying. The ideology that more GRPs means greater success is severely flawed, and by using such a calculation in a highly targeted and customized solution like programmatic buying, one misrepresents the technology’s true value.  However, instead of arguing the utility of GRPs, it is more critical to consider alternative means of success in marketing and how embracing programmatic can revolutionize your approach to online advertising, while driving a variety of critical KPIs.  

Programmatic buying is growing quickly, and is responsible for billions of dollars in digital media placements. Programmatic buying is the intersection where data and advertising truly meet, with engineers, traders, and data-management platforms replace traditional sales planners. Agencies would like you to believe that their programmatic efforts reduce overall costs, but the truth of the situation is that, when viewed holistically, programmatic buying is actually more expensive.

Implementing programmatic buying efforts does have its merits, and agencies are quick to note that initial costs can be negated quickly. However, for programmatic buying to reach its maximum potential, marketers and advertisers must learn to move past the traditional reach and frequency mindset, and consider the long-term advantages of highly targeted placements. In fact, industry experts note that using programmatic buying to place more advertisements decreases transparency, which can lead to fraudulent placements. In using programmatic buying to deliver a highly targeted message to the right individual at the right time, brands are able to increase their visibility to the appropriate segments, increasing potential brand engagement.

Marketers must begin to understand programmatic buying from a holistic perspective. Why is this more expensive? Does it involve fewer people? Most marketers are shocked that programmatic buying proposals suggest fewer advertisements at a greater cost. While inventory is cheaper in programmatic buying compared to manual buying, there are substantial costs of doing business to implement and manage these efforts. In an article on AdAge, a media agency executive said, “Five full time employees are needed to spend $100 million national broadcast budget, while the same number would be needed for a $5 million programmatic buy.”

Understanding the discrepancy in FTEs and costs becomes more complicated when you also factor agency commissions into the equation. The employees required to manage a programmatic buy are in far greater demand, having a unique skillset that commands salaries 50-100% greater than manual buyers. The technology and the platforms do not eliminate the need for human input, and therefore it is critical to entice highly skilled employees for retention. Traditional full-service agencies have seen these employees move quickly to digital agencies that have a greater focus on new technologies, including programmatic buying. 

The true cost of programmatic buying becomes noticeable when considering agency commissions that are charged to simply breakeven. The same agency executive interviewed by AdAge stated that, with a budget of $100 million, break-even points begin at 1% with TV, and quickly jump to 10-12% with programmatic. It is also worth noting that the 12% commission is only the break-even, with many agencies charging a rate of around 20%, to turn a meager profit.

There is a substantial cost of placing media through a programmatic partner. AdAge refers to these costs as an “intermediary tax” which accounts for all the transactions that take place to make a programmatic buy occur. With 7% to 20% taken by ad exchanges, another 10% to 20% taken by automated software providers, and then another 15% for the data-management platforms, there is potential that only $.50 of every dollar will reach the publisher. While these rates may seem expensive, there is value in using programmatic buying; however, the marketer should be fully aware of the intended use of programmatic, with no expectation that they are receiving a more targeted solution for a lower price.

While so far we have discussed mostly the potential benefits (and drawbacks) of programmatic buying, there is always a need to manage costs. Consider the following best practices when working with your agency to ensure greater transparency in your agreement.

Contract Language

  • When contracting with your programmatic buying partner, ensure that language exists around specific rates. Furthermore, consider a period where you can renegotiate these rates to be more favorable.

Redundant Services

  • Prior to considering your programmatic needs, understand the services you require and what you may need outside of traditional manual buying. When working with multiple vendors (which is common with programmatic buying), there is potential to be charged for the same service multiple times.

Liberate your Data

  • Unless specifically outlined, your data may not belong to you after working with a particular partner. If you are unable to retrieve your data during any part of the process, the supplier immediately gains tremendous advantage.

Understand your Options

  • Do you need managed service, or do you need self-service? In a self-service agreement, the vendor charges for the use of their technology, but does not charge for any resources associated with operating the platform. A managed option typically has charges for not only the technology, but also the management fees associated with run and execute a campaign.

Consolidate

  • Find a partner capable of providing you with a variety of services, and consolidate your marketing to that one agency. Using separate agencies to plan and execute your manual and programmatic buys is inefficient, and unless information is shared freely across agencies (it probably will not be), the effectiveness of both operations will be hindered. Consolidation also allows for better reporting and recognition of opportunities across channels.

As for the future of programmatic buying? It’s only anticipated to grow. EMarketer predicts total programmatic buying spend to exceed $20B in 2016. When it comes to digital marketing, there is no “one size fits all.” While programmatic buying is typically more expensive than other traditional tactics, there’s no doubt the method offers significant ROI in the form of operational speed and efficiency and increased scale and targeting. Like any other agency sourcing engagement, do your due diligence when looking for the right partner for your programmatic buying requirements.  Beyond assessing agency scale, technology and data analytics, and skillsets, take steps to establish a strategic client-agency relationship. This begins with strong contract language that drives further value from your programmatic efforts and continues with fostering ongoing communication and transparency with your agency.

Peter Portanova is a marketing category enthusiast and Project Analyst for Source One Management Services. He is an expert at developing RFPs and executing strategic sourcing strategies for clients in a wide array of industries, specializing in navigating the complexities of the Marketing spend category. Click to learn more about Source One’s Marketing Category expertise.

 

Turnover: Temporary Anomaly or Omnipresent Reality

26 Feb

 

 

agency compensationChief Marketing Officers come and go every twenty-three months or so. The average Client-Agency relationship tenure is thought to be around three years. So has anyone really noticed that average ad agency turnover is reportedly running between 28 – 30 percent? 

In an industry where change and upheaval have become constants, the agency talent crisis has likely not received the attention that it deserves… outside of the agency community. Clearly, this is a dynamic that agencies in general and agency HR executives specifically are acutely aware and are trying to address. After all, in a service business that is highly reliant on talented professionals with diverse skill sets to create and deliver their product, the talent challenge cuts to the heart of agency sustainability. 

During the fall of 2014, Digiday published an article entitled; “Anatomy of an Agency Talent Crisis” which suggested that entry-level salaries were one of the primary challenges in attracting college graduates to even consider a career in advertising. In light of the 4A’s annual talent survey findings, which found that “most entry-level salaries” for agency personnel “were between $25,000 – $35,000,” most agency insiders understand the challenges in attracting and retaining top tier talent. 

The question, which has not been addressed is; “Why aren’t agencies paying more to secure top college graduates?” If a capable young person armed with a college degree can earn a starting salary of $70,000 by going to work for Accenture, McKinsey, Booz & Company, Adobe, Google or Microsoft then it stands to reason that advertising agencies must close the salary gap if they hope to attract their fair share of talent. As the American inventor and businessman, Charles Kettering once said: 

“We should all be concerned about the future because we will have to spend the rest of our lives there.” 

Importantly, this is a decision which the agency community owns. Their ability to pay higher salaries to attract young graduates is not hindered by the fees being paid by advertisers. Unfortunately, many advertisers have little exposure to many of the agency “worker bees” deployed on their account, spending most of their time interacting with more senior “point people” such as account directors, creative directors or senior media planners. As such, advertisers may have little transparency into the high turnover rates being experienced within the agency community. 

That’s not to say that advertisers aren’t paying a price from a learning curve perspective, which can affect the caliber of an agency’s work or the number of iterations required to generate satisfactory outputs. 

What is intriguing when looking at the fully-loaded hourly rates being charged by agencies, is that there appears to be plenty of room to increase compensation for junior to mid-level personnel. 

There are a couple of issues which impact an agency’s willingness to free up funds to address the pay scale issue. The first is the growing salary disparity between entry-level personnel and senior executives. One need look no further than the 4A’s own 2014 talent survey, which found that in the same year in which entry-level personnel were earning on average between $25,000 – $35,000, they had an agency report a $1,000,000 base salary for a Chief Creative Director position. 

Additionally, agency holding companies are growing and require resources to fuel their expansionary appetite. This growth comes largely via acquisitions of specialist agencies and investing to support in-network horizontal integration strategies which have spawned the birth of digital media trading desks and the creation of global cross-platform production hubs

Ultimately, market dynamics will force the agency community’s hand when it comes to a reapportioning or prioritization of resources to address the competitiveness of their salary offerings. Smart agencies will move to address this issue, recognizing that the lack of success in recruiting top college graduates combined with 30% staff turnover rates, is clearly not a formula for success.

Is Legacy Thinking Impeding Your Progress?

07 May

ana agency financial management conferenceEmerging media, rapidly expanding technologies, a changing tax and regulatory environment, talent shortages and a global paradigm shift where marketing is being “outsourced” to the end user. These were just some of the topics addressed by Marketers and Agencies alike at the ANA’s annual “Agency Financial Management” conference in Naples, Florida in early May.

While there may be significant issues to be faced in the near future, the marketing industry remains a significant component of the global economy whose rate of growth outstrips that of most developed countries GDP growth.  That said there are changes required of the industry’s stakeholders to better prepare their organizations’ to successfully navigate a complex landscape fraught with both risks and opportunity.

This dynamic will require a fresh approach by clients and agencies alike along with a willingness to shed the bonds of legacy thinking, which has retarded industry progress on a number of key fronts in recent years.

One of the themes to emerge from the conference is that marketing is difficult, expensive and challenging.  When combined with talent, resource and education restraints being faced by many marketing organizations there is a belief that marketers are leaving dollars on the table.  Contributing factors range from digital media value erosion to a lack of transparency into certain aspects of the supply chain such as trading desks to the absence of industry governance on the issue of cross platform audience delivery measurement.

Underlying these challenges is the fact that client-side marketers, procurement professionals and marketing service agencies are still working on evolving their relationships and gaining better alignment on how best to optimize the advertisers’ return on marketing investment (ROMI).  Central to the success of this collaborative effort is the need to build trust and mutual respect among these stakeholders.

Interestingly, marketers expressed a strong, almost universal need for the introduction of uniform controls, competitive fee structures, tighter statements of work and the use of agency performance incentives to assist in positively driving change.  One aspect of boosting ROMI is the elimination of “waste.”  Based upon our experience in the area of agency financial management consulting, we have found that an excellent starting point for marketers in this area is to clarify the roles and responsibilities of their agency partners, minimizing redundancies and identifying those agencies that are considered strategic partners versus those that provide project-based support.  This provides a solid starting point for determining  “where” to begin in terms of initiating change and inviting those select partners to be part of the process.

On the “good news” front it was clear from the results of a recent survey conducted by the ANA and presented at the conference, that the trend toward an increased level of collaboration between marketing, finance and procurement is taking seed.  Further, as evidenced by findings from a separate survey conducted by the 4A’s, the agency community has clearly begun to accept procurement’s role in the agency sourcing and contract negotiation process.

There is one area however, which has the potential to seriously disrupt marketers’ efforts to optimize their ROMI… transparency, or more specifically, the lack of transparency that permeates the industry.  This was reflected in the results of survey data from the ANA, WFA, ISBA and ACA where “transparency” was identified by advertisers as one of, if not their top concern.  The lack of clarity and in some instances, honesty surrounding issues such as data integrity, audience delivery, trading desks, reporting and financial reconciliations creates financial risks for advertisers and undermines attempts to improve trust levels between clients, agencies and media sellers.  As Mike Thyen, Director of Global Procurement for emerging markets at Eli Lilly and Company so aptly stated:

“Where there is mystery, there’s margin.”

Examples of the potential for financial leakage related to a lack of transparency included the results from the aforementioned WFA study, cited by ANA President and CEO Bob Liodice, which found that for every dollar invested by advertisers in digital media, only fifty-five cents on the dollar flowed through to the publisher.  Inherent in this single example is the lack of transparency surrounding programmatic media buying, agency trading desks and the lack of auditable outcomes in terms of audience delivery, media rates paid and trading desk margins.

Changing times require firms to evolve and innovate in order to remain relevant with their customers and to improve their operations.  When it comes to marketing, the rate and rapidity of technology driven change is such that viewing today’s opportunities through an “old school” prism is certain to create risks and limit marketers’ ability to fully leverage their investment.   Keeping an open mind, forging strong relationships between marketing and procurement, implementing controls and reporting to enhance transparency and investing in one’s agency partnerships represent key actions to be considered to successfully face the changes which are underway.

Take Stock of Your Marketing Supplier Network

26 Apr

marketing agency networkWhether viewed in the context of the marketing dollars that flow through an advertiser’s marketing services agencies or their respective roles in building an organization’s brands and driving revenue, a marketing supplier network is a valuable corporate asset.  So how much do you know about the agencies which comprise that network?

Boosting supplier visibility within the C-suite of an organization can yield significant strategic and economic benefits.  The process begins with taking an inventory of those suppliers, their corporate lineage, resource offering, skills, pricing and historical performance on behalf of the company.  Without this knowledge it will be a challenge to optimize the investment made in maintaining this network.  Constructing a database with pertinent details on your supplier organizations is a pre-cursor to assigning roles and responsibilities across an advertiser’s agency base and for determining internal oversight responsibilities.

If this is an activity the organization has yet to undertake, there is a high likelihood that there is a significant degree of overlap across the supplier base and a less than optimal utilization level within a select group of marketing agencies.  Why should an advertiser care?  Because there is an attendant cost to contracting with marketing agencies and to retaining them on the advertisers agency roster… whether those agencies are being effectively utilized or not. 

Additionally, it is quite likely that the controls that are in place vary greatly from one supplier to the next.  This begins with the master services agreement (MSA) that is in place, whether or not such contracts have been executed and or kept current and extends to the resulting statements-of-work (SOW), agency staffing plans and remuneration programs.  While there is an obvious need for customizing MSAs and SOWs by agency type, there are certain terms and conditions ranging from “non-disclosure” and “non-compete clauses” to “right to audit” clauses, “document retention” policies and “intellectual property rights” assertions which provide critical controls that should be present in each MSA.  The question is; “Are they?” Further, once an MSA and or an SOW has been reviewed, updated and executed these documents should be retained in a central database for “ready access” by authorized representatives from Marketing, Procurement, Legal, Finance and Internal Audit.

Cataloging agency costs is another important step in constructing a marketing supplier database.  Armed with a deeper understanding of agency bill rates, overhead rates, direct and indirect expenses and multipliers an organization will be able to construct agency remuneration packages that are fair to the agencies and which generate savings for the advertiser.  One of the important bi-products of this information is the ability to benchmark supplier costs across agencies and makes for some interesting comparisons for those advertisers working with multiple agencies owned by the same holding company.

Implementing a systematic marketing supplier performance review program to be followed by the advertiser’s marketing department and marketing suppliers will provide a layer of qualitative data to further assess the effectiveness of each agency and to proactively identify potential weak links within the network.  Laggards can be targeted for performance improvement actions and or replaced in the event of continued sub-par results.

Ironically, the most valuable benefit of a marketing supplier database is the role it can play in advancing an organization’s collaborative supplier management (CSM) initiatives.  Aside from boosting agency performance and marketing ROI a well-orchestrated CSM program will enhance supplier satisfaction, longevity and fuel supplier motivation to invest in the client-relationship.  In the words of former Federal Reserve Chairman, Alan Greenspan;

“I have found no greater satisfaction than achieving success through honest dealing and strict adherence to the view that, for you to gain, those you deal with should gain as well.”

Interested in learning more about supplier visibility systems?  Contact Cliff Campeau, Principal at Advertising Audit & Risk Management at ccampeau@aarmusa.com for a complimentary consultation. 

 

Do Perspectives Drive Outcomes?

04 Jun

By way of background, I have spent my entire career as a marketing professional.  Of note, I have both advertising agency and client-side experience in addition to having worked in the field of marketing accountability, auditing marketing spend and marketing agency performance.  Hence, I have always been perplexed by the notion that marketing executives were thought by some to be unwilling participants in working with their peers in procurement or finance to help them better understand and assess the stewardship of an organization’s marketing investment.

I don’t believe that anything could be further from reality.  The truth is that the vast majority of marketing professionals have an inordinate sense of obligation to go along with a fiduciary duty to invest their organization’s marketing budget in a manner that will yield the greatest possible return… whether that is brand positioning, revenue generation or market share increases.  To that end, marketers and their agencies work diligently and tirelessly to make every dollar invested work as hard as possible.

Of note, many industry pundits feel as though advertising agencies have fallen from their pedestal and position of respected “partner” to that of a “vendor” who does little more than sell their wares for the best possible price to the highest bidder.  In spite of the fact that the average client-agency relationship tenure is a few years rather than a decade or more as in the recent past, categorizing an agency as a vendor unfairly diminishes the role and contributions made by both the agency community and the client-side marketers that direct their efforts.

Thus, it was no surprise to see the results from CMG Partner’s recent survey that found CMOs had expanded their roles and perspectives within their organizations, becoming something akin to a “CEO of Marketing.”  The trying times related to the global recession and the downward pressure on marketing spend at a time when organizations sorely need to drive demand generation, while challenging, have forged a stronger breed of senior marketing executives.  The report also recognizes that while the marketing profession has made considerable gains in terms of greater corporate influence, it is on “the threshold, rather than in full flower.”  The report concluded that the CMO must “not only earn his or her place at the table” but also “his or her voice.”

So how can marketing executives take advantage of the upward corporate trajectory to achieve broader authority?  One answer would be to fully embrace the use of independent third-party compliance and performance audits to improve corporate transparency into all facets of the marketing supply chain and openly share how an organization’s investment is being stewarded by the marketing team and their agency network.  Transparency and recommended improvement opportunities can help to further the understanding that other corporate stakeholders have with regard to marketing plans, processes and outcomes.  Further, independent reviews of the efficiency and efficacy of the marketing spend can benefit marketers by building peer level trust in their resource decision-making framework and the competency of their agency partners.

An independent assessment of a marketing agency’s contract compliance and performance does not emanate from a lack of trust on the part of a client organization.  Advertisers that have embraced progressive corporate governance initiatives have an obligation to ensure that the large sums of money being invested in this important area are being managed capably and in concert with the terms and provisions of the client-agency agreement.  Thus, the agency community, like any good corporate partner, should both welcome and support a client’s efforts to hold marketing accountable to the same standards that other functions within the organization are held to.  Agencies can benefit from the process as well.  Both as it relates to the independent validation of the investment that they make in the relationship as well as to use the compliance audit process to better align their resource investment and remuneration with the client’s business objectives.

In the words of Michael Josephson, one of the United States’ most sought after ethicists:

“What you allow, you encourage.”

Interested in learning more about the potential benefits of a marketing agency compliance audit?  Contact Don Parsons, Principal at Advertising Audit & Risk Management for a complimentary consultation at dparsons@aarmusa.com.

Do Agency Brands Still Matter?

27 Aug

agency brandsTimes have changed. In 1984 the average client agency relationship lasted 7.2 years. Ironically, while that may seem like a short duration, by 1997 it had declined to 5.3 years. Where do you believe it is today? Gone are the days when the advertising agency relationship was so esteemed that advertiser CEO’s were often on point for managing what was viewed as an invaluable resource. Advertising agencies once measured the span of their client involvement in decades and prided themselves on the longevity of those relationships. Unfortunately, transience has supplanted stability as the law of the land.

CEOs are seldom involved with the organization’s agency network, the Marketing function has lost some of its luster within the executive suite and according to a 2010 Spencer Stuart study, CMO’s turnover every 28 months on average. On the agency side, as holding companies greatly expanded their collection of traditional agency brands and specialty shops many with overlapping and often indistinct resource offerings the cache of the individual agency nameplates began to diminish. Add to this the trend that has emerged in numerous high profile agency reviews of the holding company offering to assemble a team of subject matter experts from across its network to serve up a “Best in Class” solution to the prospective client. While this approach certainly has appeal, on paper, aggregating professionals from companies with different cultures, philosophies, perspectives and processes has seldom proved to be the elixir advertisers and agencies alike have sought. Remember Enfatico?

Agency brands should matter, perhaps more so in today’s environment than at any time in the past. Whether they do or don’t is not what is at issue. The asset value of a strong agency brand to its diverse stakeholders can be significant. It starts with instilling a sense of belonging with the agency’s associates, which in turn leads to a feeling of pride and a passion for the work which they do, which drives employee satisfaction and reduces turnover.  Enhancing agency employee tenure is an important component in acculturating associates into the agency’s philosophy and belief systems, driving familiarity with advertising planning and development processes and creating a level of comfort and confidence among the client facing representatives with the agency’s solutions offering.  Stability and consistency in this area can greatly enhance the agency’s ability to achieve in-market success for client brands, which can transcend the environment of change and emphasis on short-term results that often permeates client-side organizations. Importantly, strong brands attract buyers.

Brands attract buyers based upon a known set of attributes which help to shape buyer expectations of what they’re getting, minimizing unexpected surprises and reducing buyer remorse. Clients that are satisfied with the agencies that their organization has bought into will invest the requisite time, energy and resources into those relationships, thus heightening the odds of success.

In the end, success, however each party in the client-agency relationship defines it is the key to rejuvenating individual agency brands and helping to stabilize a somewhat unsettled marketplace. As David Ogilvy once said; “The pursuit of excellence is less profitable than the pursuit of bigness, but it can be more satisfying.” I would contend that once excellence is achieved, profits will follow. One needs to look no further than average agency direct margins today vis-à-vis ten, fifteen or thirty years ago to prove that point.

Follow Blog

RSS Feed

OR

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Featured Posts

Sign-up for a complimentary “Mitigating Market Risk” Consultation.

sketch_auditJoin our community of global advertisers who seek marketing investment transparency and improved stewardship.

Click Here to Subscribe